25: I have an eating disorder.

A photograph of a sunny path in the woods with shadows from the trees stretching across it. Text reads “Starting Down My Path to Recovery. Seeking Sara.”

Trigger and content warning: eating, food, weight, eating disorder, bingeing, restricting, treatment, recovery.

I have an eating disorder.

It’s taken me a full year to reach a place where I can say that sentence out loud, but now that I have, I feel a tiny piece of its hold on me slowly peeling away. I was diagnosed well over a year ago, but have only started the nitty-gritty of treatment very recently.

So why am I writing about it on my blog?

Well, for one thing, my blog is a place that I can go to write what I’m feeling and it helps me to process things in a constructive way. In a big way, this space has always and will always be for me. A big part of Seeking Sara is unraveling myself and finding out who I am inside. (Alexa, play the Mulan soundtrack!)

But I also want to be open about it because if it weren’t for people in my life being open about their own struggles, treatments, and roads to recovery (including potholes along the way), I never would have been brave enough to seek help. So another massive reason I am being open about this topic is in order to reach out to others to say, “You are not alone.”

The last big reason I am writing about my disordered eating on Seeking Sara is that it is not unrelated to being Autistic. I began subconsciously, (then more consciously, but to my deep shame and suffering) using food, bingeing, restricting, and overall disordered eating to cope with sensory overload, to avoid meltdowns and shutdowns, and to find some sense of control in my life.

Bingeing has become a type of self-harm stim to me. Restricting has become a way to control at least something in my life when I so frequently am overwhelmed by the world around me, not to mention my various health issues and disabilities. But these are not healthy or productive ways to cope. The fact that I can see that now is not a small baby step, but a giant, giant leap toward my long marathon run toward recovery.

One reason I avoided seeking help for so long is the uncanny ability eating disorders have to convince you that they are no big deal. Cycles of denial and acceptance are pretty much guaranteed companions during anyone’s treatment and recovery. I have no doubts that I will struggle back and forth for months–and probably years–to come, but now that I know that and accept that, it makes it easier to cope.

So how did I decide I really did have a problem I needed to address?

I’ve known for a long time, but the final tipping point was a journal assignment my therapist gave to me. The prompt was, “What is your relationship with food like? Write a letter as if it were a real person.” The two images below are my letter to food.

(If you are using a screen reader, please click the images. Alt-text is attached.)
An image of a purple notebook page with text on it. The date reads January 1, 2019. Above the date is a branch with red buds. Text reads, "Dear Food, We need to talk. My relationship with you has been unhealthy for 18 years. It's true that I can't live without you, but sometimes you make me feel like I can't live with you either. You are nourishment, energy, life, necessity. You are addictive, controlling, an unhealthy coping mechanism. I need you. I love you. I hate you. I hate that I need you. You provide me with escape... and yet I can't seem to escape you. The solace you provide is temporary and leaves behind regret, frustration, and a shame.
The second page of the letter reads, "Where you soothe, you also blister. You are a gulp of cool water laced with poison. We need to talk. We have 28 years to evaluate--18 of them troubled. You know I won't ever leave you, but things between us are about to change. I can't leave, but I can loosen your hold on me. I will no longer use you as a crutch that feeds me lies and self-hate. We need to talk. Sara." Beside Sara's name is a graphic of a pen. Under her name is a branch with blossoming red flowers.

Was I shocked by what I wrote? Extremely. What started out as a seemingly-silly therapy homework assignment that I was doing only grudgingly soon pulled emotions up from deep within me as the words cascaded onto the page. What I expected to be a few lines or bullet points in my journal turned into a chilling look at how I really felt. It captured the push-and-pull, back-and-forth, ebb-and-flow love/hate relationship that I’ve been running from since I was 10.

But, like I said: Denial and acceptance are at constant war within me. The next day, I was back to the complacent “I’m fine” attitude. But this time… I had something to look back on. I looked at that letter and felt those same feelings rising up in me again. And suddenly… I couldn’t turn back. I couldn’t go back to believing everything was fine…

But more importantly, I didn’t want to.

So what now?

Well, I’m diving in to treatment head-first with my therapist, continuing to journal (no matter how silly a prompt seems), talking with my loved ones who have eating disorders, doing seemingly small things like asking doctors not to tell me my weight, and reading lots.

I’m cycling back and forth between two books:

The simple yellow cover of Body Respect: What conventional health books get wrong, leave out, and just plain fail to understand about weight. By Linda Bacon and Lucy Aphramor.

1) Body Respect by Linda Bacon, PhD and Lucy Aphramor, PhD and RD (Amazon link here).

The pretty yet simple white cover of Life Without Ed: How one woman declared independence from her eating disorder and how you can too. By Jenni Schaefer.

2) The 10th anniversary edition of Life Without Ed by Jenni Shaefer (Amazon link here).

Cycling between the two has been invaluable to me so far. Body Respect challenges our views of weight, fatness, calorie counting, dieting and more, while Life Without Ed shows me that I am not alone, shows me recovery is possible, and teaches me very practical techniques that I can use.

Getting to Know the Enemy

One of the most important things I have learned from Life Without Ed so far is the concept of naming my eating disorder. By doing this, I can begin to separate out thoughts and impulses that are genuinely mine and which are from the eating disordered part of my brain. It also gives me something to roll my eyes at and tell to go away!

One exercise I did once I named my disorder was to write down all the things it says to me. Once again, what I thought was kind of a silly activity turned into me easily writing a page and a half of terrible things that it says to me–and has done for 18 years. That was another eye-opening moment for me and one that will stick with me throughout treatment and well past recovery.

So there you have it. I have an eating disorder.

But I’m not terrified like I have been for years. I feel anxious. Sometimes I feel powerless. Sometimes I feel like I can’t do it. Occasionally I still feel denial. But now I know how to recognize these feelings and thoughts as products of my eating disorder, not myself.

I have an eating disorder… and I’m going to kick its butt.

A meme with a photograph of a sunny path through the woods. Text reads, "I have an eating disorder. I began subconsciously using food to cope with sensory overload, to avoid meltdowns and shutdowns, and to find some sense of control in my life. As I start down my long path to recovery, I am reaching out to others to say "You are not alone."I have an eating disorder...and I'm going to kick its butt."

[Featured image, image description: A photograph of a sunny path in the woods with shadows from the trees stretching across it. Text reads “Starting Down My Path to Recovery. Seeking Sara.”]