Anniversary Interview 4: My Parents

Anniversary Interviews

Welcome to the last anniversary interview where I interview loved ones about my Autism diagnosis! To read more about why I’m doing the interviews, check out the first interview (linked below).

The interviews will be with: (link opens in new tab)

1) New friends: Anniversary Interview 1: New Friends

2) A high school friend: Anniversary Interview 2: High School Friend

3) My husband: Anniversary Interview 3: My Husband

4) My parents

Then, I will share my reflections on the experience. Enjoy!

Note: These are all people who have been actively trying to learn about Autistic people and how to better interact with and support us. Please be understanding and forgiving of anything like using person-first language (“person with autism”), using functioning labels, or anything of that nature.  All of those being interviewed are being gracious enough to agree to put themselves in a vulnerable situation, and I really appreciate that. Thanks!


Anniversary Interview: Mom and Dad

1) What were some of your initial thoughts when I came to you about the possibility that I might be Autistic?

Dad: Well, my first reaction to the notion was “Huh?”  My only personal experience was with children, and most of them were very “low-functioning” boys with “classic” (that is to say, stereotypical) behaviors.  The “highest functioning” high school boys I knew were still largely non-verbal, avoided eye contact, acted out if they didn’t get what they wanted. Not knowing how autism is often manifest in women, I’m afraid I was kind of dismissive because I didn’t see the stereotypical behaviors I had (wrongly) come to associate with autism.

Mom: My first reaction was, “What?”  I mean, Dad’s describing experiences with my students and children from church.  I know a lot about autism, but in retrospect, it’s mainly with autism that creates very diverse and multiple learning needs, including large communication challenges.  Autism is a spectrum, but I had predominantly studied the more challenging end of the spectrum.

2) Is there anything you would have done differently as a parent had you known?

Dad: This is a difficult question to answer.  I admire who you are as a young woman, your many insights and talents, ability to articulate your thoughts, your witty banter.  So, is this who you would be today if we had raised you differently? I think we went to bat for you at school when we knew about issues, but you kept your experiences of middle-school bullying so private that we didn’t know until you were in college.

Mom and Dad: Maybe we would have found a different way for your piano lessons so they would have engaged you more appropriately/deeply, or would have understood that horseback riding was more like therapeutic riding to you and not just considered it a hobby.

Mom: You always had such unique needs anyway, due to your dietary difficulties, that I think we pretty much dealt with whatever presented itself.  There may have been things that went on internally, but you rarely shared inklings of those things.

3) Looking back at me in my younger years, what kinds of things make more sense to you now?

Dad: You may have a different perspective on this than we do, but we tried to raise our children to lead their own best lives, to speak their minds, to develop their interests and talents as they emerged.  We took you to soccer as long as you were interested, not because we dreamed of you being a pro-soccer player.

We didn’t have plans for you to be a straight-A student, or grow up to be a doctor, or a lawyer, or a pastor, or a teacher.  So we always tried to engage the “you” that was presenting at the time, not some artificial expectation of a “you” we had in our own imaginations. For example, you were frequently around hundreds of people (at church, etc.) and we let you engage — or not — as you wished.

Mom: We’ve always raised our kids to be their individual selves, so any journey of self-discovery is great!

Mom and Dad: Since we were taking our cues from you, we’re not entirely sure that knowing about your diagnosis sheds any more light on things.  At least, we don’t have any memories of thinking, “Why is she doing that?!” that knowing about autism helps us understand in hindsight.

Dad: Maybe I wouldn’t have insisted so much on giving goodbye hugs and kisses to grandparents if I’d known how uncomfortable they made you.

Mom: I wouldn’t have insisted on those anyway.  I’m an introvert, so I understand personal space and value quiet or less chaotic environments.

4) What kind of positive changes have you seen in me in the last year? How have I grown or changed?

Dad: The more you learn about yourself (not only regarding autism but also ADD) the more comfortable you appear to be in your own skin, if I can put it that way.  You understand (and own) that your needs are valid and are perhaps your own best advocate for them, such as wearing noise cancelling headphones in noisy public settings regardless of what others might think.  That’s really great!

A meme with a cityscape background and a white diamond in the middle. The text reads "The world is such a loud place and it seldom stops talking. Wearing noise-cancelling headphones allows me to filter out the assault of noise and focus on your voice. SeekingSara174.wordpress.com." There is a graphic of blue headphones in the middle with a tiny heart between the earphones.

Mom: It seems like you have fewer fibro[myalgia flare] days, and this may be because of paying attention to your sensory needs and knowing to take breaks when you need to.

Dad: Yeah.  You continue to push yourself, but now understand the importance of respecting your internal pacing rather than trying to please some external measure of success.

5) What do you think about Seeking Sara? What kinds of things are still unclear to you? What would you like me to write about in the future?

Mom and Dad: I think we’re both really proud of your blog.  It’s quite an ambitious undertaking, and it’s been great to see not only your personal growth in self-awareness but also the number of others who are gaining insights into their (or their children’s) lives.

Dad:  I’m probably biased, but many blogs seem to be rather shallow (“This is what I’m wearing/eating/doing today…”) but Seeking Sara has real depth to it.

Mom: We’re wondering if there are things you think we could have done differently for you in your childhood if we had known.

Dad: I would like to read more about how music affects you, and if there are ways you use music to accomplish certain tasks that you would find otherwise difficult.  For example, if you get anxious before a doctor’s visit, are there certain types of music you listen to that help you center and stay calm? If you become fearful on a long car ride, does music help you address the fear (not just help pass the time)?  I’m also curious about the observed connection between autism and the microbiome/GI issues, but I don’t know enough about this to frame any specific questions.

Mom: I’d also like to know more about how autism gets diagnosed outside of a school setting, because that’s all I’m familiar with.


A huge thanks to my parents for being so brave and open-minded when doing this interview. I love you guys!

A massive thanks to all the people who agreed to be in the spotlight. You guys rock!

And lastly, a big thanks to everyone who read the interviews!

[image description: A picture of blue flowers with a big white rectangle placed on top of it. Text on a blue box reads, “Interviewing My Parents About My Autistic Self.” The words “Parents” are written in blue while the rest is written in white.]

Anniversary Interview 3: My Husband

Anniversary Interviews

Welcome to the third anniversary interview where I interview loved ones about my Autism diagnosis! To read more about why I’m doing the interviews, check out the first interview (linked below).

The interviews will be with:
(links open in new tab)

1) New friends: Anniversary Interview 1: New Friends

2) A high school friend: Anniversary Interview 2: High School Friend

3) My husband

4) My parents: Anniversary Interview 4: My Parents

Then, I will share my reflections on the experience. Enjoy!

Note: These are all people who have been actively trying to learn about Autistic people and how to better interact with and support us. Please be understanding and forgiving of anything like using person-first language (“person with autism”), using functioning labels, or anything of that nature.  All of those being interviewed are being gracious enough to agree to put themselves in a vulnerable situation, and I really appreciate that. Thanks!


Interviewing My Husband

1) I told you very early on in our friendship that I was probably Autistic. What were your initial thoughts?

My husband: I hadn’t had any close friends who were autistic before, so I didn’t really have any preconceived idea about what to expect. I knew that I liked you and we were getting along well, so I was happy that you were willing to be open with me. I was glad you wanted to help me get to know and understand you better.

2) What’s it like being married to an Autistic person? What are some of the things you love about my being Autistic?

My husband: It just seems like such an integral part of who you are that I couldn’t imagine and wouldn’t want you to be any other way. I try my best to pay attention to when you might be overstimulated or near a meltdown and do what I can to help you avoid or recover from those situations. I definitely find myself noticing strong smells, sights, and sounds that may cause problems for people with sensory issues more than I used to.

I have learned so much about autism and the autistic community and I try to use that knowledge to better myself and be a better ally.  I really appreciate you teaching me about how diverse the autistic community really is in terms of race, gender, sexual orientation, interests, etc. It is vitally important for allies to listen to autistic people’s narratives and stop spreading misconceptions.

3) What kind of positive changes have you seen in me in the last year? How have I grown or changed?

My husband: You’ve been self-advocating and much more willing to stim and be yourself around others. I’m very proud of you and it’s inspirational to see you start being more authentically you.

I now realize how much you have to mask and what a drain it is on you. I can tell what a relief it has been for you to start masking less when you feel comfortable.

4) What do you think about Seeking Sara? What kinds of things are still unclear to you? What would you like me to write about in the future?

My husband: I think it’s amazing and so important for you to share your experiences. I’m so happy you’ve been able to reach and help so many people.

I really liked your podcast with Jeanette [Purkis] and your collaboration with Elyana [Prismatic] and would love to see/hear more collaborations with other bloggers and advocates out there. I’m proud of how hard you work to be an advocate, and are part of such an important movement of autistic people being heard.


A huge thank you to my lovely husband for letting me interview him. I love you!

The next interview will be with my parents!! Stay tuned for that next week.

Thanks for reading!

[image description: A picture of green leaves and a few purple flowers with a big white rectangle placed on top of it. Text on a blue box reads, “Interviewing My Husband About My Autistic Self.” The word “husband” are written in green while the rest is written in white.]

Anniversary Interview 2: High School Friend

Anniversary Interviews

Welcome to the second anniversary interview where I interview loved ones about my Autism diagnosis! To read more about why I’m doing the interviews, check out the first interview (linked below).

The interviews will be with:

1) New friends: Anniversary Interview 1: New Friends (link opens in new tab)

2) A high school friend

3) My husband: Anniversary Interview 3: My Husband

4) My parents: Anniversary Interview 4: My Parents

Then, I will share my reflections on the experience. Enjoy!

Note: These are all people who have been actively trying to learn about Autistic people and how to better interact with and support us. Please be understanding and forgiving of anything like using person-first language (“person with autism”), using functioning labels, or anything of that nature.  All of those being interviewed are being gracious enough to agree to put themselves in a vulnerable situation, and I really appreciate that. Thanks!


High School Friend: “Billy Bob”

Note: My friend has asked to use a fake name in this interview. True to her hilarious nature, she has chosen to be called “Billy Bob.” I want to thank her for stepping up to do this interview and agreeing to be the solo interviewee this round!

1) What were some of your initial thoughts when I told you I might be Autistic?

Billy Bob: When I first heard that you might be Autistic I was kind of surprised and shocked only because I had no idea about most of the things you’ve been going through. Although you did share some things that were happening in your life, I wouldn’t have guessed that Autism could be a factor.

2) You’ve known me for a long time. What did it feel like to find out how much of myself I had (unintentionally) been hiding from you?

Billy Bob: So kind of similar response to the question above with being shocked and surprised. I was also sad to know that you have been hiding this for a while and didn’t share with friends who care about you, but I could also understand why you didn’t share sooner.

I can only imagine how hard it was to be going through this newfound information by yourself or with only a few people aware. I also know it is not easy to open up about personal things. It is hard, scary/nerve-wracking, personal, new to you, and you’re still trying to process and understand it all.

3) Looking back at me in high school years, what kind of things make more sense to you now?

Billy Bob: Well, I know we didn’t talk too much in the beginning of high school and it wasn’t until we were in summer gym classes together that we really started to speak more and become friends.

I always thought it was cool that you were in choir. I admired people who could not only sing, but also have the guts to perform in the school plays and color guard. I think we really bonded when you asked me to read the book you began writing.  Reading and writing were always things you loved to do since I’ve known you and it hasn’t changed because now you’re writing your blog!

So looking back you were still reserved kind of like you are now, but not as much as before. With Autism, I know it must be hard to openly talk to and be around people so being reserved like that makes sense now. You also have always enjoyed music and I think it was a way you could escape from social interactions without even intentionally knowing it.

4) What kind of positive changes have you seen in me in the last year? How have I grown or changed?

Billy Bob: I have seen so many positive changes in you, not only this past year, but since I’ve known you. Since opening up about your Autism you’ve been able to share a part of yourself that you were afraid to share (which, like I said before, you have every right to be nervous!) Like I stated earlier it is not easy to open up about something that is new to you for the fear of being judged, not understood, etc.

I’m so grateful that we’ve become closer every year of our friendship and still continue to become closer. And we’ve learned a lot about each other and our similarities by continuing to talk and by even playing that silly Facebook quiz game (the one where we had to guess each other’s responses lol).

Also having the courage to start a blog to talk to the world about what you are going through is amazing. I don’t think the Sara in high school would have done that so I’m so proud of you for coming so far. And you even spoke on a podcast, which was fantastic and also a new experience you’ve conquered! So keep it up because you’re making wonderful positive changes. 

5) What do you think about Seeking Sara? What kinds of things are still unclear to you? What would you like me to write about in the future?

Billy Bob: So I think you already know this but I think Seeking Sara is wonderful. It is a great way to express all your new adventures and everything that you’ve gone through in this journey of life. It is also a great way to showcase your photography because I really like your pictures.

You’ve been able to explain what you are going through so as of right now there is nothing unclear for me, but if something comes up you know I will ask lol. And keep writing the content that you have because I cannot wait to read more!


A huge, huge thank you to “Billy Bob” for being so gracious and agreeing to do this interview, especially alone! You are fantastic!

The next interview will be with my husband! Stay tuned for that next week.

Thanks for reading!

[image description: A picture of yellow flowers with a big white rectangle placed on top of it. Text on a blue box reads, “Interviewing A High School Friend About My Autistic Self.” The words “New Friends” are written in yellow while the rest is written in white.]

How to Be an Accessibility Ally: Screen Readers

When I first started blogging, I had no idea that there were some simple steps I could take to make my posts much more accessible to my audience. I began adding descriptions to images on WordPress and Twitter and found that it’s really simple. I (naively) figured that most sites must be describing images that way. Then I met my friend Elyana who helped me test run some Voiceover software on my phone and I became painfully aware of how inaccessible most images are on the web.

Elyana has been gracious enough to teach me some basics about creating a more accessible space for visually-impaired and blind people on the internet, and she agreed to do an interview on the subject. I hope that you will take her words to heart and follow some easy steps that make the difference between accessible content and inaccessible content.

Following the interview are some how to visual guides for sighted allies who want to learn how to make their content more accessible. Happy reading!


Accessibility Interview: Elyana Ren

1) What is a screenreader and how does it work?

Elyana: Screen readers give blind and visually-impaired people access to computers, phones, and smart devices. A screen reader is a software program that interfaces with an operating system to render the visual elements (i.e. what’s on screen) into text that is ‘read’ out by a synthesized voice or which can be read on a connected braille display. The screen reader user then uses the keyboard to interact with those elements.

I would like to take this time to point out that, while most screen reader users are blind or deaf-blind, this does not mean that some don’t navigate by using residual vision (with or without magnification software.) Likewise, most screen reader users just use speech to navigate, but many use speech and braille or only braille, in the case of some deaf-blind people. But the concept is still the same: screen readers take what is on screen and present it to the user in a format that is accessible to them.

Note: The following video was created by Sara to give an example of how a screen reader might read text and image descriptions. It is a highly abridged version of what most screen readers can do.

To navigate around a website, for example, the screen reader relies on the HTML code of the page to tell it how to ‘speak’ the elements to the user. Websites tag multi-level headings, links, form fields, buttons, images, and other elements, and screen readers can read that data to the user. If, for example, I were on the Seeking Sara blog, I could hit the letter H and my screen reader will jump from heading to heading, allowing me to scroll through blog titles in the same way someone would scan visually. Once I’ve found the title I was looking for, I can simply use a keystroke to click on it and then read it by either using the arrow keys (like one would in a word document) or using another command to jump from paragraph to paragraph.

The same concept is applicable to screen readers on smartphones and tablets, such as Voiceover for iOS. Basically, when a screen reader is enable on a smartphone, it adds a sort of overlay atop of what is shown on screen so that the user can hear what is under their finger before they click on it. Then, like with letter navigation on the computer, we can use gestures to have the screen reader read out different things, such as headings, words, or characters.

2) What kind of obstacles do you encounter on the internet? What sites are generally inaccessible for you?

Elyana: As mentioned above, screen readers rely on the underlying HTML code of websites to communicate to the user what is on screen so that  the user is able to interact with that content. One of the biggest barriers to accessibility is when things are improperly labeled or not labeled at all. For instance, some sites are completely graphically-driven, meaning that all my screen reader will see and read back to me is a giant image — even if there is text visually on screen. I don’t know enough about web coding to provide exact details on how to fix this, but I have seen enough wonderfully accessible sites to know that it is completely doable.

Another thing that makes navigating sites a little more difficult is videos that autoplay. Not only is it distracting, but screen reader users usually rely on speech output, so it is very difficult to do anything if all I can hear is an ad for the latest game or something. Some web browsers do make it so that you can do a keystroke and it will mute the active tab, but not all of them (as far as I know).

3) What are some of the most accessible sites for you? What do they do that makes the difference for you?

Elyana: The best sites are designed inclusively. This means that they take the time to make sure that everything on their site is accessible not only to screen readers, but also to people with other accessibility needs. This means that everything behind the scenes is properly labeled but also that visual elements, like graphics, background and text contrast, text size, and font choice are also taken into consideration.

4) What is alt-text? What is an image description?

Elyana: Essentially, alt text is a tag someone can add to an image that will make it accessible. I hesitate to call it a caption, because I feel like the trend nowadays is to use captions to comment on a photo rather than describe it. So this is where an image description comes into play. An image description, which is basically what it sounds like: text that describes an image for blind and visually-impaired people, is placed in the alt text field of an image in the HTML code of a website to tell a screen reader to read the description aloud. Otherwise, a screen reader would just read the metadata (i.e. time stamp/file name) of a photo, or simply read it as “image,” neither of which gives us access to said photo.

5) What makes a good image description?

If I’m being honest, image descriptions are so under-used that I get excited when I see any described photo; however, there are certain elements that make a description more effective than others. Some descriptions I have seen are as brief and to the point as “A girl collecting leaves in a wagon,” providing enough of an overview that I can synthesize it with whatever post it is attached to. Some can be longer, such as “A young blonde girl in brightly colored clothing collecting autumn leaves in her shiny red wagon”, which gives me a better understanding of the perspective or mood of the photo. So for me, a good description does not depend upon length as much as it does on helping me understand the aim of the image.

The image in Elyana's example. A young blonde girl in brightly colored clothing collecting autumn leaves in her shiny red wagon.

6) Some people may be hesitant to use certain things in descriptions, such as color. Should people worry about those things? Is there anything you personally don’t want to be in a description?

I can’t speak for everyone, but I don’t want people to feel hesitant or worried about using language that talks about visual things around me — not just in image descriptions but in everyday conversation. For me, color is just another tool I have in my vocabulary of descriptors. So I guess the short answer is: I can’t think of anything I don’t want in a description because anything that can go in a description is just providing me with a deeper understanding of the image.

7) What are some other ways people can make the internet more accessible for visually-impaired and Blind people?

I think one of the things people might not realize is that not all images that are just blocks of text on a colored background are not necessarily accessible to us. There are apps that strip text from pictures, and Facebook has added a layer of accessibility to help parse some memes, but most of them are just an image that screen readers can’t read. One of things that would help is adding a description to those types of images. It can be as simple as typing the text in the body of the post or, in the case of Facebook, pinning a comment to the post in question.

Another thing that is helpful is to capitalize the first letter of every word in a hashtag because screen readers will read each word separately instead of trying to string together all the letters into a mush of phonemes. For example: when my screen reader sees: #allforoneandoneforall” it tries to put all of the vowels together, resulting in me hearing: “alforowndeenodanaforal.” But when the hashtag is written like this: “#AllForOneAndOneForAll,” my screen reader knows to separate out the words, resulting in me hearing “all for one and one for all” as intended.

Final comments from Prismatic:

The last thing I’d like to say is that I appreciate all of Sara’s work to make her content more screen-reader-friendly. I can’t speak for other access needs, or any other blind person, but I am very grateful for creators who go out of their way to ask their audience what they need to be able to participate in their content.

Finally, thank you all for reading this post! I know that it can be a hard thing to remember sometimes, or maybe a hard thing to go back and fix, but really, I just ask that you try to use some of these tips moving forward. I am open for questions or discussion and am happy to provide feedback on your content if you want. I can also provide funny screen reader fails, because they can be pretty awesome!


ABOUT ELYANA

Elyana and her yellow lab guide dog. Yana is laughing with joy as her dog turns to lick her face. Yana wears a green Hufflepuff sweater and a plaid hat.

Elyana Ren is a proud Hufflepuff and unquenchable bookworm. She grew up in the middle of the Pacific, but found herself after moving to the Pacific Northwest. Her works feature the authentic experience of being disabled, neurodivergent, and queer. When she isn’t writing, she uses the creative arts to empower others to trust and love their own voice. Elyana can be found on Twitter @aprismuncovered and on www.aprismuncovered.wordpress.com. If she isn’t there, she is probably in the company of a few good books, her guide dog, and her collection of plushies. Actually, always check there first.


Below are some visual guides created to help sighted people turn on and use image description options.

How To Add Image Descriptions on WordPress

A visual guide detailing how to add alt image text to images on WordPress.
EDIT: YOU CAN ADD ALT TEXT TO FEATURED IMAGES! Go to EDIT–>Featured Image (on the righthand side of the screen)–> After you assign a featured image, hover over the pencil icon to edit–> Add in description in Alt Text box!

How To Add Image Descriptions on Twitter via Computer or Phone

For Twitter’s explanation (without image guide) including Android instructions: https://help.twitter.com/en/using-twitter/picture-descriptions

A visual guide detailing how to add alt image text to images on Twitter from a computer.

 

A visual guide detailing how to add alt image text to images on Twitter from a computer.

Yenn’s Autism Show: Sara Earhart

I recently had the awesome opportunity to be interviewed by Yenn Purkis–Autistic author, blogger, presenter, and advocate. Their podcast is called The Yenn Purkis Autism Show (Formerly known as Jeanette’s Autism Show at the time of recording.)

In this episode, we chatted about blogging, the Autistic community, identity, and more!

Click the link or picture below to be redirected to the podcast! Both open in a new tab. (WordPress isn’t allowing me to embed the podcast here for whatever reason.)

The interview: https://jeanettepurkis.podbean.com/e/jeanettes-autism-show-sara-earhart/

A screenshot image of the podcast player showing Sara's interview. The title reads

Yenn’s links:

Podcast channel: https://jeanettepurkis.podbean.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jeanettepurkisbooks/
Blog: https://yennpurkis.home.blog/
Website: www.jeanettepurkis.com
Twitter: @yennpurkis

We hope you’ll enjoy!

[Featured image description: On the lefthand side is a picture of Sara in front of Niagara Falls. Sara has sunglasses on top of her blue hair, noise-cancelling headphones around her neck, and a plushie duck in her hands. On the right is a blue box with the words “Podcast Interview. Talking about Autistic identity and community, blogging, gender, and more! The Yenn Purkis Autism Show: Sara Earhart” A small drawing of Yenn is pictured in black and white. They have their eyes closed and are smiling widely while holding a framed picture of their apartment.]

Anniversary Interview 1: New Friends

Anniversary Interviews

November 2018 marks one year since my “official” clinical diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder. When brainstorming what I wanted to write about, I was finding it difficult to come up with anything meaningful or interesting. For the last 6 months of doing Seeking Sara, I’ve been doing 98% of the talking, and I thought it was time to turn to loved ones in my life for their thoughts and insights on my Autistic experience.

The interviews will be with:

1) New friends

2) A high school friend: Anniversary Interview 2: High School Friend

3) My husband: Anniversary Interview 3: My Husband

4) My parents: Anniversary Interview 4: My Parents

Then, I will share my reflections on the experience. Enjoy!

Note: These are all people who have been actively trying to learn about Autistic people and how to better interact with and support us. Please be understanding and forgiving of anything like using person-first language (“person with autism”), using functioning labels, or anything of that nature.  All of those being interviewed are being gracious enough to agree to put themselves in a vulnerable situation, and I really appreciate that. Thanks!


New Friends: Ivana and Nicole

1) What were some of your initial thoughts when I told you I’m Autistic?

Ivana: I don’t think you told me directly. I think I read it on your blog. To be honest I didn’t think much of it. I know other people with autism and know about it. I know there is a huge range as far as traits go. I was very impressed by how open you are and that you are using your experiences to help out and reach out to other people. I also thought you were a great writer!

Nicole: Initially I was surprised and curious to know more about your diagnosis.  As someone who works with children, I’ve had some experience with children who are on the autism spectrum, but these interactions were typically with youth who are “low functioning” or fall on the more “severe end” of the spectrum. My Mom also has worked for several years as a classroom aide for elementary students with IEPs, very often those with “severe autism” included. You didn’t seem to meet my perception of what autism looked like, hence the surprise and curiosity! I don’t think it would have ever occurred to me that were an autistic person if you hadn’t told me.

2) How has your perception of me changed since I told you? What do you notice about me now?

Ivana: I did notice sometimes when we have been talking you might look away and focus on something else. I assumed that helped you when there might be too much stimulation in the environment. I also noticed how you sat at the end of the table at the [wedding] rehearsal dinner, because I know that’s something I do as well to cope with my anxiety. 😊

Nicole: I don’t think my perception changed all that much, but that is at least partially due to the fact that I didn’t know you for very long before I knew you were autistic. What I notice most may be your behavior in social interactions— your comfort level and engagement with others can vary and if you seem to be taking some alone time, I respect that. Reading your post about small talk and eye contact was really interesting to me and something I keep in mind if we may be socializing together.

3) Is there anything about me that made more sense to you after I told you?

Ivana: I think I got a better understanding why you and I connected so easily & quickly. I have social issues that I struggle with.

Nicole: As I mentioned before, since I didn’t know you very well before I knew you were autistic, I don’t think I had the opportunity to really notice any differences or reflect on behaviors.

4) What kind of positive changes have you seen in me in the last year? How have I grown or changed?

Ivana: I don’t think I’ve known you long enough to really answer this, but I know as we’ve gotten to know each other better you have opened up to me much more. Every time we see each other I feel like I know you more.

Nicole: You’ve become more confident in yourself! You have grown more comfortable in your communication with others and in sharing your personal stories and experiences, both in person and via the blog (of course).

5) What do you think of Seeking Sara? What kinds of things are still unclear to you? What would you like me to write about in the future?

Ivana: I think your blog is wonderful and I know I’ve learned things from reading it. I’m not sure if you’ve already written about this but I’d like to know more about how you started writing. Did you already have a blog before your diagnosis? What really makes you want to share your experiences? Were you hesitant about sharing in anyway?

Nicole: I think Seeking Sara is wonderful and applaud your bravery to share so much about yourself with others! You have really opened my eyes to the variety of experiences and struggles those with autism can have on a daily basis, and I’ve gained a better understanding of what it means to be an autistic adult especially. Your post about sensory issues with foods specifically really made me think about how such a basic task such as eating can be a challenge.

I truly appreciate that your writing makes me think about many everyday experiences that I take for granted, or don’t think about at all. I’d love to hear more advice for how I can be helpful and supportive to those with autism, as well as more about your personal experiences from day to day.


A huge, huge thank you to Ivana and Nicole for being so gracious and agreeing to do this interview. You’re both awesome!!

The next interview will be with one of my high school friends.

Thanks for reading!

[image description: A picture of red tulips with a big white rectangle placed on top of it. Text on a blue box reads, “Interviewing My New Friends About My Autistic Self.” The words “New Friends” are written in red while the rest is written in white.]

24: Ritalin, My Life-raft

What started as a series of sleep and nap studies ended in me getting parts of my life back, some of which I hadn’t realized were missing.

In a similar fashion to my ASD diagnosis—where I described the road to diagnosis as “a journey of good luck, strange happenstance, and unexpectedly compassionate therapists“—serendipity, happenstance, and listening to my gut also led to my being diagnosed with ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder).

Confused? I don’t blame you. Here’s what happened:
(Feel free to skip this next section if you just want to read about my Ritalin experience.)


HOW A SLEEP DISORDER DIAGNOSIS LED TO AN ADD DIAGNOSIS

“Sleep disorder, unspecified. Hypersomnia.” I looked down at the sleep study report the doctor had just handed to me. Underneath a big block of medical lingo were those two lines that I squinted at with confusion.

“Hypersomnia?” I asked. “So… like the opposite of ‘insomnia’? You’d said I probably had narcolepsy. Why is the sleep disorder unspecified?”

“Yes, exactly,” she replied. “Based on your nap study, we can see that you clearly have extreme excessive daytime sleepiness and difficulty remaining awake. We suspected narcolepsy, but you didn’t enter REM sleep in your nap trials, despite falling asleep very rapidly in all of them. But regardless, the treatment will be the same as it would for narcolepsy. I’m going to prescribe you a drug called ‘Provigil.’ It’s commonly prescribed for shift workers and narcoleptics. I had a narcoleptic woman start taking it recently and she said it changed her life!”

As I held the first dose, I was anxious, but excited. This medicine had the potential to “fix” me—at least for a while at a time.

I finally worked up the courage to take it, then got busy while waiting the 30-60 minutes it would take to work. In about 30 minutes, I felt an extreme lethargy slowly washing over me. I became even more drowsy than usual, and began to enter a numb shutdown mode.

I felt like I had dived into a deep pool; everything was muffled and cold around me, but I slowly surfaced back up to alertness as the medicine wore off.

The next day, I was determined to try again. “A fluke,” I thought. “I was just too nervous when I took it.” But the same thing happened. It made me feel so strange, having the complete opposite reaction to something.

One text to a family friend (who’s a pharmacist) later, and I had my answer. “Paradoxical reaction/effect” was a real thing! I wasn’t imagining it. It was a rare side effect (2% kind of rare), but it was real and it had happened to others. My doctors told me to stop taking the medicine immediately.

The reaction led me to researching paradoxical reactions, reading about stimulants, and searching on forums for others with similar reactions. I found that some people with ADHD/ADD had had similar reactions. Many of the experiences they described sounded like lines written from my own life. I started to wonder if ADD could be one of the final pieces to understanding my brain. (Note: Anyone can experience a paradoxical effect, not just people with ADD/ADHD.)

My sleep doctor suggested we try Ritalin next. This made me pause. “Should I be talking to my therapist before I start Ritalin?” I wasn’t sure if I should be evaluated by a psychiatrist before starting it, just in case I did have ADHD/ADD.

I decided I should after talking with a fellow Autistic friend diagnosed with ADHD. We talked until 4 AM because things were just finally clicking into place. There were so many “Ah hah!” moments and I began to feel just like I did when I realized I might be Autistic: denial, excitement, dread, grief, anxiety, and finally—utter relief.

So, I brought it up to all 3 of my team: therapist, GP, and sleep doctor. My therapist assessed me and confirmed that I have ADD. My GP agreed to help with dosing for ADD, using the old “killing two birds with one stone” metaphor. My sleep doctor was all for it.

Holding that first dose felt like I was standing on a towering springboard at the edge of the pool. Would I sink to the bottom again? I worked up my courage and took the first dose… and started my new normal.

RITALIN, MY LIFE-RAFT

It turns out that Ritalin works for me. Like, really, really works. Not only does it banish at least 75% of my chronic fatigue while it’s active, it makes me alert and awake, and allows me to function an entire day without crippling sleepiness and an absolute need to nap. I had forgotten what it felt like to be fully awake. For the last decade, it was rare that I could make it through a single day without napping. Now I can do it with relative ease. I’m finding that the day has so many more hours than I remember it having!!

But what happens to my mind is equally as life-changing.

My whole life, I’ve been treading water. I’ve been fighting so many currents, trying to stay afloat. I’ve been fighting to stay afloat, feebly trying to snatch at tasks and getting bowled over by the tide.

A picture of teal waves with lots of foam. Text reads, "Ritalin is my life raft. It keeps me afloat so that I don't struggle to function at a very basic level. When I'm on it, I'm not flailing around aimlessly in the water. I move in a single current with direction and ease."

Ritalin is my life preserver, my life raft. It keeps me afloat so that I don’t have to struggle to function at a very basic level. When I’m on it, I’m not flailing around aimlessly in the water. I move in a single current with direction and ease.

Jumbled thoughts and impulses used to crowd in all around my mind, each demanding to be attended to all at once. My mind would flit from task to task, leaving half-finished projects in my wake. I struggled to begin, switch, and end tasks. Sometimes, I would get so hyper-focused on a single task that hours would pass me by. I labelled myself undisciplined, lacking self control, distracted, impulsive, and lazy.

Since starting Ritalin, I’ve felt my confidence soar, my anxiety levels plummet, and my outlook on life brighten. I’ve been able to look at myself through an even more accurate lens than with just my ASD diagnosis. I’m not lazy; I’ve been working hard just to function. I’m not undisciplined; my mind is moving too fast to focus on one thing for very long. I’m not unusually lacking in self control; I have ADD.

Now begins my quest to adapt to my new normal. For so long now, my life has been built around my excessive sleepiness and exhaustion. It’s been built around my need to hide my frantic, scatter-brained, hyperactive, 90 mph anxiety-inducing mind and my hyper-focused binges. But now that I have the life raft that is Ritalin to help keep me afloat, I can start focusing on things I haven’t dreamt of in a decade.

(…Yes, pun intended.)

 

[image description: A photograph of teal waves with lots of white foam swirled through them.]